Chinese Medicine Concepts

Treating Menstrual Pain and Hay Fever
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Treating Menstrual Pain and Hay Fever

Treating Menstrual Pain and Hay Fever. You can ease symptoms from these two common conditions using acupressure massage. You have the power in your fingertips to feel relief.

Learn more about acupressure massage here.

Menstrual Pain

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), menstrual pain is often associated with imbalances in the body’s vital energy (Qi) and blood. TCM views the menstrual cycle as a reflection of the balance between Yin and Yang, and disruptions in this balance can lead to symptoms such as menstrual pain or cramps. Here are some common patterns and TCM approaches for addressing menstrual pain:

1. Qi Stagnation:

  • Symptoms: Dull, achy pain, usually before or during the menstrual period.
  • Treatment: Acupuncture and herbs to promote the smooth flow of Qi. Moxibustion (the application of heat) may also be used.

2. Blood Stasis:

  • Symptoms: Sharp, stabbing pain, often with dark menstrual blood.
  • Treatment: Herbs and acupuncture to invigorate blood circulation, such as peach kernel, safflower, or frankincense.

3. Cold in the Uterus:

  • Symptoms: Severe cramping, relieved by the application of heat, and a preference for warm drinks.
  • Treatment: Warming herbs like ginger, cinnamon, and moxibustion to expel cold.

4. Kidney Deficiency:

  • Symptoms: Dull, persistent pain, fatigue, and possibly lower back pain.
  • Treatment: Tonifying herbs for the kidneys, such as goji berries and rehmannia, along with acupuncture to nourish kidney Qi.

5. Liver Qi Stagnation:

  • Symptoms: Emotional stress or irritability accompanying menstrual pain.
  • Treatment: Herbs and acupuncture to soothe liver Qi, such as bupleurum or mint.

6. Spleen Qi Deficiency:

  • Symptoms: Dull, achy pain, fatigue, and digestive issues.
  • Treatment: Strengthening herbs for the spleen, like ginseng and astragalus, and dietary adjustments.

Lifestyle Recommendations:

  • Warmth: Apply heat to the lower abdomen with a hot water bottle or warm compress.
  • Diet: Avoid cold or raw foods, and include warming foods like ginger, cinnamon, and soups.
  • Exercise: Gentle exercises like yoga or walking can help with Qi circulation.

As with any TCM approach, it’s crucial to consult with a qualified TCM practitioner for an accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment plan.

Hay Fever

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) approaches hay fever, also known as allergic rhinitis, by addressing the underlying imbalances in the body that lead to allergic reactions. TCM views the body as a holistic system with interconnected energy pathways, and it aims to restore balance to these pathways to promote overall health. Here are some common TCM principles and approaches for managing hay fever:

  1. Wind-Cold or Wind-Heat Invasion:
    • TCM often attributes hay fever symptoms to an invasion of Wind-Cold or Wind-Heat. Wind is seen as a carrier for external pathogens that can cause illness. Depending on whether the symptoms are accompanied by a sensation of cold or heat, different herbal formulations may be recommended.
  2. Balancing Qi and Blood:
    • TCM emphasizes the importance of balanced Qi (vital energy) and Blood flow in the body. Acupuncture and herbal remedies may be prescribed to regulate the flow of Qi and Blood, addressing symptoms such as nasal congestion, sneezing, and itchy eyes.
  3. Strengthening the Defensive Qi (Wei Qi):
    • The Wei Qi is considered the body’s defensive energy that protects against external pathogens. TCM treatments may focus on strengthening the Wei Qi to improve the body’s resistance to allergens.
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